Church Books Built on Storied Architecture by Design

Discover Church on the top shelf

When you find yourself surrounded by books eight feet high and climb the stairs only to hit a glass ceiling you know you’re working in publishing. They’ve stuck you in a room and locked the closet door but there must be a way out. There is, Church Publishing is hiring.

Ramsa sofa by Younes Duret

Ramsa sofa by Younes Duret

After spending this week curled up on the sofa working on the fifth edition of Cosmo Starlight’s Freedom Incorporated work is still not complete and I sometimes think Church is a made up story. Books have become our foundation but I can’t see any lying around because they’re all on the computer screen.  It’s almost as if our President has reallocated everything in print just to build his eHouse, sparing trees which could be more useful as his shelter. eLiterature proves reading is more economical and accessible online.

courtesy of inhabitat.com

But, if only there were a way for people to see how many books Church Publishing has to choose from online, here it is!

courtesy of mother nature network

Believe it or not, our world was built on books. Everything you see, touch, eat, smell, learn about and repeat is in a book someplace. In fact, books have been used for hundreds of years to build society.

In the future books will exist but there won’t be as many per capita print editions per title. And at the current level of technological advancement trees are better off serving as bookshelves,

from Not Tom design studio

as desks,

at TU Delft architecture bibliotheek

or re-purposed as chairs.

Furniture made by Alvaro Tamarit posted on ‘Colossal,’ Art and Visual Ingenuity, Colossal

It scares some to think the world will no longer look like this,

at Shakespeare & Company

or like this,

but people aren’t turning books into trash.

Copyright: Alicia Martin, Biografias 2003. Casa de América, Palacio de Linares, Madrid. Foto: Mario Marquerie

Books aren’t on the chopping block.

made by Jane Dandy

Books are being displayed more cleanly.

design by Lu Chieh-Hua and Cheng Tzu-Hao

They’re being preserved behind glass to last a life time.

John Rylands Library courtesy of John Heskes’ photostream

In the future there will still be places you can find books shelved on walls so don’t freak when bookshelves aren’t traditionally constructed either.

Kocham.to

Kocham.to

Relax, and become an eBook person!

Church Sees Writing on the Wall

This week Church Publishing has been reading about Ryōtarō Shiba, a Japanese author, between re-editing one of our favorite novels, Freedom Incorporated by Cosmo Starlight, in preparation for its fifth edition release. In this novel Freedom is a massive low security work camp with no borders, it is the world. Instead of describing the prison, what it looks like, the system people work within or how it feels, Cosmo Starlight writes the story of how one prisoner realizes the place he was born into is not the same place mapped in Freedom’s charter, a document every child is forced to learn, after being followed for trying to get away from things.

In Freedom Incorporated the protaganist refuses to call the prison freedom because groups with separate agendas and secret systems of government seek to exert control over free-thinking individuals. When he refused to call the system freedom one group of wardens poison him and an opposing group locks him in jail. To secure his release the latter group attempted to coerce him into testifying that this prison is called freedom and the guards he caught chasing him were just a figment of his imagination. He refused again and they condemned him to solitary confinement.

The character doesn’t mind living in prison. He actually likes concrete rooms and mattresses without sheets. And he found a way to keep sane, turning Freedom Inc. into Freedom Ink by writing his experience down in order to lead the prison system without bombs or bullets, powders, and with fewer police men.

Ryōtarō Shiba, whose namesake memorial museum is pictured below, was born in 1923 Osaka, Japan. He studied Mongolian, traveled, and similar to Ernest Hemingway began writing historical novels after an experience in journalism. “Fukuro no Shiro,” The Castle of Owls, perhaps his most well known and widely read inside Japan, is about Ninjas and won the Naoki Prize in 1960.

Shiba Ryotaro Memorial Museum

Another one of his novels, “Ryōma ga Yuku,” is about following the leader. This historical novel shows Samurai were instrumental in bringing about Japan’s restoration after two hundred years of isolation and details the civil war and assassinations that resulted from calls to renew a relationship with Western culture. After realizing innovation had propelled Western societies far ahead of Japan’s, sentiments at that time were Western technological advancement could benefit citizens of the island nation. Change didn’t come cheaply and many Japanese heroes sacrificed their lives in what was called the Meiji Restoration in 1868. It’s success, however, was responsible for the emergence of Japan as a modernized nation.

Ryōtarō Shiba was a prolific author who wrote at least 39 novels and a massive series of journals about his travels across East Asia to places like Korea. His work took on a critical look into modern life and gave the men and women of Japan moral support proceeding a devastating world war.

His namesake memorial museum pictured above, designed by Tadao Ando, was built next to the house the author lived in for future generations to enjoy. It’s filled with the books Ryōtarō Shiba collected .

According to Tado Ando the objective of the architecture was to create a visualization of the inner workings of an author’s mind. Curved and partly underground, a garden, natural light moving into darker interior spaces reveals an exhibition of literature three stories high.

One window that filters light into many patterns symbolizes how humanity breaks down into individuals of all shapes, sizes, and minds. That’s what the author saw, and what he tried to reveal to the world.

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Sources: Wikipedia, Flickr, Architectuul

Church becomes a Riffle Books fan

Church Publishing has a new facebook fan page up and running. Visit and like our fan page!

After spending some time trying to create a shopping cart below our header (some of the big publishers are lucky enough to have custom-made internship and imprint blocks) we’ve been checking out Riffle Books, a new way to discover stuff to read via a very visual social channel. In addition to attracting the eye using big pictures so that books sell themselves by cover design, it has cool tools pushing people to read along the lines of 50 titles to read before I die -or- required reading for my ideal wife to buy. As a cliché, and from a writer, you should never judge a book by its cover. But that’s not really how you’ll be introduced to new titles here – beautiful covers only entice you to tear open their jacket.Riffle Books is a social platform. Novels that pass before you are ones friends and book club buddies have run their hands through. In that sense it’s sort of like Goodreads, a service that I’m a member of and share a large network with but don’t use as often as my to-do list tells me to.

On Facebook I stare at posts capturing sights unseen instead of reading more informative textual messages. It’s a digital age, and our attention span is getting that short. Visual perception is instantaneous, Riffle Books may just be the new service that gets you to read your next book. If it does that’s great because we’re writers. Go ahead and try it out by clicking the image of Abraham Lincoln to peep their site. But before you do ‘Like’ the new Church Publishing Fan Page so we can keep in touch!                                                                                                     -Noodle

Click on the image for Riffle BooksClick on the image for Riffle Books

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© Copyright 2011 Church Publishing.  All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2011 Church Publishing. All rights reserved.